Sandpoint Photographers

Is Hiring a Sandpoint Photographer That Important?

Are you currently in limbo about hiring a Sandpoint photographer? Do you understand that you have a need for a photographer like this, but you just don’t want to pony up the extra cash for the service?
I know you’ve considered placing disposable cameras on every table and asked the guests to take shots of everyone around them. And this makes the celebration more fun for the guests. But let’s face it, the quality of the pictures from those cheap cameras sill not do your wedding justice.

So why should I hire a Sandpoint photographer?

Well, this is a once-in-a-lifetime event. The memories from this day are going to last a lifetime. The photos taken should be of a high enough quality that they’ll stand the test of time just like your special day. Choosing the cheap route will guarantee you lackluster photos of kids and family members, poor poses and setting, always people in the picture that shouldn’t be there. You need a professional who is going to deliver a photo that you’ll be proud to blow up and display at the entrance of your house for a lifetime.
Plus your wedding album should look like the dream you always imagined. If you hired a professional Sandpoint photographer, you won’t have to worry about it. Using friends or family to take your pictures will result in a wedding album that just looks like a scrapbook.
I cannot stress this enough. There are certain events in life that only happen once. When it is your turn to experience them for yourself, why would you even consider skimping out on a photographer to immortalize the event forever. Hire a professional photographer in Sandpoint to make the memories of that day last a lifetime.

Benefits of Polarized Sun Glasses

It is important to protect your eyes from too much Ultra Violet (UV) light from the sun. Wearing polarized lenses early in life helps to prevent conditions like ADM and cataracts as you get older. Always wearing UV protected sunglasses when you are outdoors can protect you from the unseen dangers of the sun. Pterygium and cancer of the eye are other conditions that develop due to too much sun exposure. Polarized sunglasses, which help filter horizontally diffused light, are especially important for people who spend a lot of time around water. Especially if they are outdoors at mid-day, when the sun’s rays are most intense. Sunlight, as it reflects off the water or snow, can be almost twice as damaging than direct sunlight alone. It is important for skiers and snowboarders to wear protective lenses as well. Polarized lenses block much of the glare caused from reflection off these surfaces and 100% of UV rays as well.
High quality prescription glasses manufactured to correct vision should come with UV coating. Ask your local optometrist if UV coating is included on your clear lenses.
Wearing large brimmed hats when you are outdoors offers another layer of protection against the damaging effects of the sun. Sometimes our sunglasses do not cover as much of our face as we need. Wearing a hat as well will protect your eyes from the direct gglare of the sun at angles where the glasses do not cover.
And do not make the mistake of thinking sunglasses are just for sunny summer days! Dangerous UV rays still penetrate the clouds on overcast days, and winter UV rays are just as dangerous as summer rays.

Learn more about Vision Home Remedies and ways to Improve Vision Naturally.

Eye Care Health

Adult macular degeneration is traditionally described as that form of the disease that affects individuals over the age of 55 years. However, it has been recently discovered that a significant number of these individuals may have a major genetic component that contributes to the disease. Annual eye exams by your optometrist can lead to early detection of the disease and offer better treatment options.

What does macular degeneration do to your vision

Your retina contains an extraordinary photosensitive array of cells that line the back of your eye. The light falling onto these cells in the retina is transformed into electrical signals which are transmitted to the brain centers that process and interpret them.

The most concentrated collection of photosensitive cells in your retina, including those that enable critical color and fine detail vision, are found in the Bulls-Eye center zone in an area called the macula.

Macular degeneration is the name given to that group of diseases that causes sight-sensing cells in the macular zone of the retina to malfunction or lose function and results in debilitating loss of vital central or detail vision.

Thanks to the brain’s ability to compensate and fill in the missing part of the picture in early cases with spotty macular cell damage or dysfunction, most people do not realize there is an issue. And only visit their ophthalmologist once the disease is advanced.

What are the Symptoms of Macular Degeneration?

Macular degeneration can cause different symptoms in different people. Sometimes only one eye loses vision while the other eye continues to see well for many years. The condition may be hardly noticeable in its early stages. But when both eyes are affected, reading and close up work can become difficult.

If you have been diagnosed with adult macular degeneration you are not alone.  In the United States of America, one in six people between the ages of 55 and 64 will be affected while one in four Americans between 64 and 74 will be smitten. One in three over the age of 75 will be affected. Each year 1.2 million of the estimated 12 million people with macular degeneration will suffer severe central vision loss. Each year 200,000 individuals will lose all central vision in one or both eyes. While the exact causes of macular degeneration are still unknown, research has discovered some correlations in a group of genes termed ABCR.

Possession of these genes may increase the likelihood of an individual developing macular degeneration by approximately 30 percent. However, most macular diseases appear likely due to both environmental and genetic factors that combine to cause damage and disease.

Genetic typing of patients with macular degeneration is likely to assume more and more importance in the future. It will enable ophthalmologists to identify high-risk individuals and to better understand the relationships between genetic defects, the appearance of the macula and how the disease progresses. This information will hopefully provide scientists with some of the tools they need to develop therapies that can prevent, slow and even arrest the progression of macular degeneration.

What can you or your loved one do if diagnosed with macular degeneration?

First it is important to modify those environmental risk factors that we know about.

1. Eat a low-fat, low cholesterol diet.

2. If you are post menopausal, you should consult with your physician concerning estrogen replacement therapy. This may have a favorable impact upon cholesterol lipid levels that play a role in worsening the disease.

3. Wear sunglasses with UV protection.

4. Try to consume at least two servings of leafy dark green vegetables per day.

5. Do not smoke and avoid exposure to secondhand smoke.

6. Eat food and or supplements rich in vitamin E,C and Lutein. Lutein is a plant antioxidant found in high quantities in spinach, kale and other dark green, leafy vegetables.

If you are looking for aCoeur d’Alene Eye Doctor, call the professional staff at Centennial Eye Care Center.